Negative biases toward U.S. Muslims, Islam have become more partisan
Negative biases toward U.S. Muslims, Islam have become more partisan

In the 20 years since the Sept. 11, 2001, attacks, Republicans — far more than Democrats — have increasingly come to view Islam as more likely than other religions to encourage violence among believers, according to surveys by Pew Research Center.

Why it matters: Muslims have continued to face bias and discrimination in the U.S. two decades after 9/11, and those negative biases have become increasingly partisan.

By the numbers: As of last month, seven in 10 Republicans associated Islam with violence. While only about one-third of Democrats thought the same way, they are still more likely to think of Islam as encouraging violence than in early 2002.

There are other signs of a partisan gap in views toward Islam after 9/11.

While 68% of Republicans said the religion was not a part of the American mainstream in a 2017 Pew survey, only 37% of Democrats agreed. More than half of Republicans believed there was extremism among Muslims in the U.S., compared to less than a quarter of Democrats.

About half of Muslim Americans said they experienced discriminatory actions in a 2017 Pew poll — up from 40% a decade before.

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